Entrepreneurship

Women make up half the world’s working-age population but generate only 37% of GDP. With support to make better use of the internet, women entrepreneurs can have a greater impact and generate wealth for themselves and their communities.

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To help bridge the contribution gap globally, Womenwill provides online and offline digital skilling programs, product features that support women-led businesses, and opportunities for women to gain inspiration from and connect with each other.

Globally, we offer women entrepreneurs learning opportunities to grow their business acumen and digital skills. Offerings include in-person events and online career and business trainings from Grow with Google, and business and digital marketing tutorials through the Primer app.

To scale our trainings further, we partner with Google Business Groups (GBGs). GBGs are independent, community-led groups formed by business owners to share knowledge about web technologies for local business success.

We also want to support women-led businesses through two of Google’s core products, Search and Maps. In 2018, we launched a “women-led” option on Google My Business that female business leaders can add to their listings to spotlight that their business is proudly owned, led, or founded by women.

To date, we’ve helped 110,000 women across 28 countries improve their digital skills through our Womenwill Entrepreneurship programs.

Stories of entrepreneurship

  • Photo of Mai Hi Kim Quyen

    Vietnam

    Mai Hi Kim Quyen

  • Vietnam

    Mai Hi Kim Quyen

    In Vietnam, Mai Hi Kim Quyen started a business after an accident confined her husband to a wheelchair. The couple opened Reaching Out Teahouse, a fair-trade craft center and retailer, with a mission to provide opportunities for people with disabilities.

    They eventually expanded to a silent teahouse where customers use a nonverbal menu system to order. The staff has grown to more than 70 employees, who actively contribute to local activities for people with disabilities, including wheelchair sports and teaching sign language.

    Given the large tourism industry in Vietnam, Quyen created a Google My Business listing so that people from around the world can discover Reaching Out Teahouse. Now, Reaching Out Teahouse has more than 300 positive reviews on Google. Quyen is proud of the Teahouse’s 4.7 star rating.

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  • Photo of Mariana "Meme" Wijayadi

    Indonesia

    Mariana "Meme" Wijayadi

  • Indonesia

    Mariana "Meme" Wijayadi

    After the company where Mariani “Meme” Wijayadi and her husband worked went out of business, the couple decided to strike out on their own. They started Meme Florist, a business that connects florists to consumers through an online store.

    Meme and her husband had to explain to local florists how the web could grow their businesses. They shared that a website was like a store that was open 24 hours a day, and that it could attract new customers. As Meme Florist’s network of partners grew, they used Google Analytics data to help them better understand what customers wanted, which led to stronger sales.

    Meme Florist now has 200 partners in 50 cities. At the start, digital tools let Meme start her business without a lot of capital. Today, these tools allow her to run her business with her computer or smartphone while still having time for her family.

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  • Photo of Nova Dewi Setiabudi Mathovani

    Indonesia

    Nova Dewi Setiabudi Mathovani

  • Indonesia

    Nova Dewi Setiabudi Mathovani

    Five years ago, Nova Dewi Setiabudi Mathovani and her husband opened Suwe Ora Jamu, a café serving jamu, a traditional Indonesian beverage. She remembers the hardest part of starting her business was taking that first step to get it going. Gradually, she gained confidence in herself, and she wants to impart that confidence to other women entrepreneurs.

    Nova now has a second jamu bar, Pavilion 28, where people can network, enjoy music, watch movies, and view art exhibitions. She uses digital tools to market her business and stay in touch with customers.

    While she acknowledges that there are many difficulties and challenges associated with opening a business, she believes that doing so can improve women’s job prospects, help them become more independent, and give them more time for themselves and their families. She encourages women to push forward, be persistent, and never give up.

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  • Photo of Dora Isabel Velazquez

    Mexico

    Dora Isabel Velazquez

  • Mexico

    Dora Isabel Velazquez

    Dora Isabel Velazquez founded the flower business Flores de Oaxaca, but it’s now a family affair. Dora’s daughter, Mónica Vera Canseco, serves as marketing director, and the mother-daughter duo worked together to increase the business’s online presence with a new website and a Google My Business listing.

    With Google My Business, Flores de Oaxaca can share information like photos and contact information to help more people discover them online. Thanks to these digital tools, the business now has customers in Mexico City, in other Mexican locales such as Puebla, Monterrey, and Guadalajara, and even in other countries, including Spain and the United States.

    Dora and Mónica say that bringing their business online has opened up new worlds for them. In just one year, they went from 15 to 140 orders per week, and grew 300%. They’re excited to continue their business’s growth and spread the joy and love of flowers with the world.

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  • Photo of Leona Watson

    Australia

    Leona Watson

  • Australia

    Leona Watson

    Earlier in her career, Leona Watson was a cook on a yacht, where she witnessed firsthand the power of food and cooking to bring people together. Inspired by that experience, she started Cheeky Food Events, a company that runs corporate team-building cooking activities across Australia.

    When she first started her business, Leona had a hard time rationalizing the risk of traditional advertising and the associated time lag to see results. Knowing how important an online presence is for every business, she started using Google Ads, Google’s advertising program, in 2010. She likes that it’s quick and nimble, that she can control her budget, and that she can immediately see her return on investment.

    Today, 60% of her new business comes from Google Ads. With a steady influx of customers, Leona now has time to focus on what she loves most – running her cooking events and growing her business for the future.

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  • Photo of Hatoon Kadi

    Saudi Arabia

    Hatoon Kadi

  • Saudi Arabia

    Hatoon Kadi

    Hatoon Kadi lives in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and has personal experience with the challenges women face in her country. Believing that laughter can help people overcome problems, she decided to share her comedic perspective on life with a YouTube video channel called Noon Al Niswa. Comedy helps Hatoon speak out on sensitive social issues (such as women’s right to drive) and broach potentially uncomfortable topics in an approachable way.

    With YouTube, Hatoon was able to find her audience. Even though her first video was produced very simply, it became an instant hit and went viral. Today, that same video has over 1.4 million views, and her YouTube channel has more than 350,000 subscribers.

    She believes that Arab women have great stories to tell, and that all women need to appreciate each other’s presence and support each other.

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  • Photo of Reem Fawzi

    Egypt

    Reem Fawzi

  • Egypt

    Reem Fawzi

    A self-starter who has been working since secondary school, Reem Fawzi is the founder of Egypt’s Pink Taxi. The company has two main goals: to provide safe transportation for women, and to decrease women’s unemployment rates.

    When Reem started Pink Taxi in 1994 – with just five women and five cars – she didn’t know much about technology. But she was able to build her expertise in this area, and grow her company by matching more riders and drivers through a mobile app that’s available on Google Play. The business now employs 450 women, and aims to reach 10,000 in the next two years.

    Reem believes that working allows women to form opinions and strengthen their character so that they can overcome challenges. By providing job opportunities for women, she believes she’s not only helping them get work, but also changing the way society thinks of women, so they are respected in every profession.

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